thirdorgan:


'Crucifix', Eric Gill | Tate
Eric Gill / Crucifix 1917

thirdorgan:

'Crucifix', Eric Gill | Tate

Eric Gill / Crucifix 1917

(via romanvs)

Influenced by the Western teaching on original sin, we usually place sin in a legal setting. We regard it as disobedi­ence to the commandments of God, and its results as punish­ments inflicted by God. For the Orthodox biblical and patristic tradition, however, the setting of original sin and of every sin is mainly physical. When man closes his eyes to the light, he finds himself in darkness. When he loses his center, he be­ comes disorientated. When he distances himself from life, he dies. The commandments of God are not threats about a punishment which will come from a source situated outside man. They describe the healthy state of human existence. The sickness, pain and death which follow offences against the laws of health are not punishments deriving from the laws but the natural consequences of the offences. It is not God but man who is the creator of evil. This truth is of funda­mental significance, because it means that the sinner stands before God, not waiting for God to condemn him, but him­ self taking responsibility for his own actions and so the road to repentance remains open. God in His compassion does not abandon His creatures under any circumstances whatsoever. Man has fled and is called upon to return. This return, this transposition into the realm of God, which goes with the restoration to health, the reconstitution and the transformation of human existence, constitutes the kernel of repentance, the content of the whole spiritual struggle… — Panayiotis Nellas, Deification in Christ: Orthodox Perspectives On the Nature of the Human Person, trans. Norman Russell (Crestwood, NY: St Vladimirs Seminary Pr, 1987), 177. (via thepoorinspirit-extras)
My Lord God, I have no idea where I am going. I do not see the road ahead of me. I cannot know for certain where it will end. Nor do I really know myself, and the fact that I think that I am following your will does not mean that I am actually doing so. But I believe that the desire to please you does in fact please you. And I hope I have that desire in all that I am doing. I hope that I will never do anything apart from that desire. And I know that if I do this you will lead me by the right road though I may know nothing about it. Therefore will I trust you always though I may seem to be lost and in the shadow of death. I will not fear, for you are ever with me, and you will never leave me to face my perils alone. — Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude (via observando)

(via myrisingvoice)

iheartbeingacatholic:

Remember the Sudanese pregnant mother who was sentenced to death for converting to Christianity?  She had to have her baby in jail  and thanks to social media support, international outcry and prayers, she was finally released.

She was invited to Rome by the Vatican & Italian government.  She had a private meeting with Pope Francis, who also gave her and her family a blessing.

Read More

Glory be to God.

(via catie-does-things)

theorthodoxbritreturns:

Metropolitan Theodosios (Atallah Hanna) of Sebastia joins other Christian leaders from Palestine in praying for the suffering people of Gaza

theorthodoxbritreturns:

Metropolitan Theodosios (Atallah Hanna) of Sebastia joins other Christian leaders from Palestine in praying for the suffering people of Gaza

Just finished reading this. Reading the words of St. Isaac the Syrian give me much hope for myself and others. His commentaries on the nature of God, humankind, heaven and hell, and other things can be a source of salvation and mercy to all. Highly recommended to everyone.

St. Isaac the Syrian, pray for us.

Just finished reading this. Reading the words of St. Isaac the Syrian give me much hope for myself and others. His commentaries on the nature of God, humankind, heaven and hell, and other things can be a source of salvation and mercy to all. Highly recommended to everyone.

St. Isaac the Syrian, pray for us.

Are we prepared to say that sexual purity is so central to the Gospel that any deviation threatens salvation? Are we really prepared to create such a narrow gate that only white, middle-class, cisgender, heterosexual American Christians can go through?

Or are we prepared to listen to people’s stories, to allow that we are a Body, a community composed of vastly different people with vastly different experiences, all contributing to a wonderful thriving Love? Are we going to participate in the public sphere with the knowledge that the Other is created by God just as we are? Or are we going to insist that our idea of God’s plan makes it the same for everyone?

— I’m continuing the series on unlearning purity culture today with a post about the pluralistic nature of God’s plan and sexuality. (via diannaeanderson)